Health in the News Blog


The dictionary defines a ‘guess’ as “estimating or concluding something without sufficient information to be sure of being correct”. Guessing is basically the absence of certainty. Even when we’re making what we’d call ‘an informed guess’, there’s still a high degree of uncertainty. So my question to you is, would you leave your health to guesswork?

For most of us, the answer is a resounding no. Yet the reality of the situation is that most of us are leaving our health to guesswork. Why? Because we’re not analysing our blood chemistry. Instead, we’re looking to doctor Google and misdiagnosing ourselves.

Blood chemistry is a process in which a series of biomarkers are analysed via a blood sample. It’s a diagnostic tool to interpret the body’s state of function. When our blood chemistry is in balance, biomarkers reside within the optimum levels and we are healthy. When biomarkers reside outside optimum levels though, the body is in a state of poor health, and we are exposed to health issues. Disease is preceded by an incubation period and the earliest evidence of this can be seen in blood chemistry.

When we analyse symptoms or even solitary biomarkers, we are forced to make assumptions. Therefore, when we seek to relieve symptoms - by prescribing pills or other remedies - we often fail to address the underlying health issues that are the root of the problem. As a result, the issue prevails and will eventually express itself in another form of pain or chronic disease.

In blood chemistry, there is no margin for error. It alleviates the guesswork. The position of each biomarker with respect to other biomarkers paints an accurate picture of your health. Or lack thereof. Blood chemistry allows us to identify and then correct deficiencies. It allows us to prescribe appropriate diets, supplements and medications. But most importantly, blood chemistry guides us in delivering real measurable outcomes with respect to your health. Without blood chemistry, we are blind. I will place one caveat though; everyone has access to blood chemistry, but not everyone knows how to analyse the data...